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TEST YOUR KILLER WHALE SMARTS
The Pacific Northwest’s Southern Resident orcas  lead lives starkly different from those of their captive cousins—and only 84 of them remain in the wild. Think you know all about these intelligent and social marine mammals?
Correct Answer
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Separate when the young whale turns four
Stay together for life
QUESTION 1 OF 8
Stay together if the youngster is female, and separate if male
After an orca is born, it and its family:
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Matrilines
Clans
Pods
QUESTION 2 OF 8
Killer whale families are called:
As young killer whales grow up:
They are cared for by the whole matriline
They are cared for by their mothers and sisters
They depend completely on their mother's care
They depend completely on their mothers care
QUESTION 3 OF 8
QUESTION 4 OF 8
Using unique underwater calls
Wiggling their fins and tails in distinctive ways
Three pods of related matrilines communicate by:
Nudging and bumping each other
Marine mammals
Kelp
QUESTION 5 OF 8
Killer whales are picky eaters. Their preferred meal is:
Salmon
Marine Mammals
Known to swim long distances along the Pacific Coast, these orcas can venture:
QUESTION 6 OF 8
Over 1,200 miles
Over 500 miles
Over 800 miles
100 years
In the wild, these orcas can live as long as:
25 years
60 years
QUESTION 7 OF 8
The biggest threat orcas face today is:
Pollution
Lack of food
QUESTION 8 OF 8
Climate change
FINISH
The Pacific Northwest’s Southern Resident  lead lives starkly different from those of their captive cousins—and only 84 of them remain in the wild. Think you know all about these intelligent and social marine mammals?
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